Stress as a Predictor of Adult Mood Disorders

January 4, 2011
Home » News » Stress News » Stress as a Predictor of Adult Mood Disorders

Stress as a Predictor of Adult Mood Disorders

By Rick Nauert PhD Senior News Editor
Reviewed by John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on November 4, 2010

Stress as a Predictor of Adult Mood DisordersEmerging research suggests daily stress may be more dangerous to our health than previously believed.

In a series of studies, Canadian investigators have found there may be a link between the recent rise in depression rates and the increase of daily stress.

“Major depression has become one of the most pressing health issues in both developing and developed countries,” says principle researcher Mark Ellenbogen, a professor at Concordia University.

“What is especially alarming is that depression in young people is increasing in successive generations. People are suffering from depression earlier in life and more people are getting it. We want to know why and how. We believe that stress is a major contributor.”

From parent to child, Ellenbogen and colleagues are particularly interested in the link between childhood stress and the development of clinical depression and bipolar disorder.

His team is evaluating the stress of children who are living in families where one parent is affected by a mood disorder.

“Previous studies have shown that kids from at-risk families are at higher risk of having a psychiatric disorder in their lifetime,” says Ellenbogen.

“We know that they’re not just inheriting these traits but they are also being raised in an environment that is stressful, chaotic and lacking in structure. Our goal is to tease out how this type of environment influences these children’s mental health in adolescence and adulthood.”

To assess stress levels, Ellenbogen is measuring the levels of the stress hormone cortisol which is present in saliva. Cortisol is a hormone that is produced by the body in response to stressful life events and challenges.

Ellenbogen’s recent findings have shown that the adolescent offspring of at-risk families have higher salivary cortisol levels than kids from families without disorders. What’s more, he found these elevated levels persist into young adulthood.

“Although there may be many causes to the rise in cortisol, this increase may be in part due to exposure to family stress and parenting style,” says Ellenbogen.

“We have not yet confirmed that these children then go on to develop mood disorders of their own. However, we have some exciting preliminary data showing that high cortisol levels in adolescences doubles your risk for developing a serious mood disorder in young adulthood.”

Source: Concordia University

 

 

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Stress effects the nervous system and can cause disturbance in nerve energy flow resulting in more stress and dysfunction of body function and health.

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Use Breath, Focus And Awareness To Reduce Holiday Stress

December 16, 2010

Denver Chiropractor, Dr. Jeffrey Parham, Helps Locals Find New Possibilities For Health And Wellness

December 16, 2010

Denver Chiropractor, Dr. Jeffrey Parham, Helps Locals Find New Possibilities For Health And Wellness

September 21, 2010 at 4:12 pm | Posted in Press Releases | Leave a Comment

Denver Chiropractor, Dr. Jeffrey Parham, Helps Locals Find New Possibilities For Health And Wellness

PRESS RELEASE: Denver, CO, 9-September-2010 – Wellness Rhythms and Dr. Jeffrey Parham, Denver Chiropractor are pleased to announce the addition of new health and wellness programs for locals seeking a healthier lifestyle. Dr. Parham has developed a series of programs that address the health and well-being of individuals in a holistic manner.

When an individual visits Wellness Rhythms, the chiropractor will conduct a series of tests and examinations to determine which aspects of your current lifestyle are contributing to allergies, illness, or fatigue. During the examination, the doctor will determine if there are any nerves being pinched by compressed bones in the body and the level of physical activity you are currently involved in.

The doctor will discuss past medical history, injuries, lifestyle, diet, and exercise programs. After compiling the information and analyzing the results of the tests, the doctor will be able to determine the most effective way to help an individual achieve their goals and objectives quickly and begin living a healthier life.

Diet and exercise play a big role in the body’s ability to heal and regenerate. Beginning a healthy lifestyle often requires that an individual change their eating habits and add foods that contain vitamins and nutrients that are very important to a person’s overall health. Dr. Parham develops individualized programs that meet the needs of people wishing to achieve health and wellness.

You can find more information, details and articles on the methods and techniques by used Dr. Jeffrey Parham, Denver Chiropractor to address the health and wellness goals of individuals by visiting http://www.wellnessrhythms.com today. The following contact information is available to members of the press who would like additional information with regards to this specific release.

Contact Person: Dr. Jeffrey Parham, Denver Chiropractor

Company Name: Wellness Rhythms

Address: 184 S. Pennsylvania St., Denver, CO 80209

Contact Number: (303) 722-1104

Email Contact: http://www.wellnessrhythms.com/contact-dr-jeffrey-parham-html

Website: http://www.wellnessrhythms.com

Dr. Jeffrey Parham, Denver Chiropractor and Wellness Rhythms have been recognized for addressing the health and wellness needs of locals in the Denver community. The individual programs that are developed for each patient address their immediate and long-term needs to assure that they are able to fully enjoy their lives is the focus of all plans that are developed.

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Use Breath, Focus And Awareness To Reduce Holiday Stress

December 16, 2010

Five Things You Must Know About Network Spinal Analysis

December 16, 2010

The Top 10 Ways To Reduce Stress This Holiday Season

December 16, 2010

Nov 10
30

holiday season The Top 10 Ways To Reduce Stress This Holiday Season

By Dr. Jeffrey Parham, DC

Are you feeling pulled in many directions this holiday season?  Are you feeling stressed out about the holidays? Well you’re not along.

It’s that time of year when many people shift gears and the holidays take center stage.

Often, the holiday season is not all comfort and joy. It can be a time of great emotional and physical stress.

Here are some suggestions for reducing stress so that you and yours enjoy the holiday season.

1-     Take a break each day for yourself. Try mediation, prayer, a nap or read a book.  Exercise go for a walk or do some yoga. These are ways of reducing stress and energizing the body.

2-     Eat properly and drinks lots of water. Don’t use the holidays and stress as a reason to over-eat. Although the holidays bring with them sweet treats and extra appetizers, try not to make food the prime focus. And remember, just because someone offers you something, you do not have to accept.

3-     Maintain your regular exercise routine and get to bed at your usual time or earlier.

4-     Watch your alcohol consumption. Although some people believe alcohol decreases your stress, it is only a temporary solution.

5-     Don’t overdo work, eating, drinking or being merry. Overindulging in any of these areas is draining afterward.

6-     Plan ahead and allow extra time for shopping and travel. Stores airports and highways are extra busy this time of year.

7-     Breath is great for reducing stress and anxiety in the moment especially when dealing with difficult people, crowds or standing in line. Breathe in your nose and out your mouth. Place one hand on top of the other resting them on your chest or belly as you feel the breath under them. This short video shows how to use breath, focus and awareness to reduce Holiday stress.

8-     Getting a massage is a great way to reduce stress and relax.

9-     See your chiropractor  for a healthy spine and to improve nerve energy flow. The chiropractic adjustment helps relieve stress, improve function and increase energy.

10-  Remember to be thankful for everyone in your life. Take time to smile as you connect with them. With all the additional stress that can be added this holiday season it’s important to practice some de-stressing activities so your holiday is the festive and joyful time you really want it to be.  I hope you have the best holiday season ever!

Here are some other articles you might find helpful:

  • Be The Duck – The expression goes, like water off a duck’s back. Often it’s used when talking about taking criticism. If you don’t let criticism affect you, then.
share save 120 16 The Top 10 Ways To Reduce Stress This Holiday Season

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This entry was posted on November 30, 2010 at 7:29 AM. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Posted in Denver Chiropractic Denver Chiropractor Wellness by Dr. Jeffrey Parham 2 Comments

The Top 10 Ways To Reduce Stress This Holiday Season

December 1, 2010

holiday season The Top 10 Ways To Reduce Stress This Holiday Season

By Dr. Jeffrey Parham, DC

Are you feeling pulled in a million directions this holiday season?  Are you feeling stressed out about the holidays? Well you’re not along.

It’s that time of year when many people shift gears and the holidays take center stage.

Often, the holiday season is not all comfort and joy. It can be a time of great emotional and physical stress.

Here are some suggestions for reducing stress so that you and yours enjoy the holiday season.

1-     Take a break each day for yourself. Try mediation, prayer, a nap or read a book. These are ways of reducing stress and energizing the body.

2-     Eat properly and drinks lots of water. Don’t use the holidays and stress as a reason to over eat. Although the holidays bring with them sweet treats and extra appetizers, try not to make food the prime focus. And remember, just because someone offers you something, you do not have to accept

3-     Maintain your regular exercise routine and get to bed at your usual time or earlier.

4-     Watch your alcohol consumption. Although some people believe alcohol decreases your stress, it is only a temporary solution.

5-     Don’t overdo work, eating, drinking or being merry. Overindulging in any of these areas is draining afterward.

6-     Plan ahead and allow extra time for shopping and travel. Stores, airports and highways are extra busy this time of year.

7-     Breath is great for reducing stress and anxiety in the moment especially when dealing with difficult people, crowds or standing in line. Breathe in your nose and out your mouth. Place one hand on top of the other resting them on your chest
or belly as you feel breath under them.

8-     Getting a massage is a great way to reduce stress and relax.

9-     See your chiropractor to maintain a healthy spine and to improve nerve energy flow. The chiropractic adjustment helps relieve stress, improve function and increase energy.

10-  Remember to be thankful for everyone in your life. Take time to smile as you connect with them. With all the additional stress that can be added this holiday season it’s important to practice some de-stressing activities so your holiday

is the festive and joyful time you really want it to be.  I hope you have the best holiday season ever!

Here are some other articles you might find helpful:

  • Be The Duck – The expression goes, like water off a duck’s back. Often it’s used when talking about taking criticism. If you don’t let criticism affect you, then.
share save 120 16 The Top 10 Ways To Reduce Stress This Holiday Season

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This entry was posted on November 30, 2010 at 7:29 AM. You can follow any responses to this entry through the RSS 2.0 feed. You can leave a response, or trackback from your own site.

Posted in Denver Chiropractic Denver Chiropractor Wellness by Dr. Jeffrey Parham No Comments Yet

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Mindfulness And The Wellness Practitioner

November 30, 2010

denver wellness chiropractor Mindfulness And The Wellness Practitioner

Relax into the present moment to experience Passionate Ease

by Dr. Lawrence S. Conlan DC, ND (TIME IN TRAINING by Dr. Jeffrey Parham)

Paying close attention to life through mindfulness helps us discover a world that was always there, but with immense enrichment. Without it, we miss many of life’s pleasures, like recognition of the serendipitous support from life (known to many as Grace), the subtle impulses of nature, our beloved’s voice, or the caress of the breeze on our skin. Through mindfulness we can perceive ever-greater connection to others and ourselves, and to the interconnectivity of all things.

When someone places their attention on how things should be, or are trying to figure us or anything out, a contraction in the giver and receiver of this attention occurs. When both are happening within the same person in the form of self-judgment and doubt, it’s especially difficult to bear.

Attention is an essential aspect of love and some of us are so desperate for it that we seek it in all the wrong places. Or we give it to ourselves the only way we usually received it growing up—with conditions. This creates contraction in the body and eventually leads to those parts of the body breaking down in some way.

When we’re hurting, we have the option to suffer or not. A lifetime of programming may make it seem as if there’s not much of a choice. We feel unable to meet our pain, (give it attention), without the conditioned, harsh approach that formed our mental habits from early on. Pain is usually an indicator of a part of us that has been denied, abused, unloved, disowned.

It’s amazing how just the slightest dose of attention without trying to change anything can be an act of great kindness. Mindfulness, our own unconditioned presence, can create a deep healing on all levels of one’s body-mind. Yet to the ego structure that was created before we even had a choice, (and therefore quite innocent), it can seem very challenging to let go of an oppositional approach to discomfort.

We feel most loved when we’re fully met with another’s attention without any agenda about who we are to be. We’re allowed to be just as we are, including our humanness, ego and divinity (if we must separate our ego from our divinity). This is quite a different kind of acceptance than just allowing things to be as they are in a distant, uncaring way.  We already do this with most of the strangers we pass on the street.

Mindfulness adds depth to the quality of our attention. By simply sensing without the filters of how we want things or others to be, we are not trying to manipulate ourselves or others. A natural relaxation into the moment occurs and we more easily access delicate impulses of the heart with our entire Being. It’s through our heart, without it needing to be emotional, that we sense the beauty in the moment, the beauty of the person in front of us and our connection to life itself. We experience Passionate Ease.

As a wellness practitioner, I find that I’m in a great position to support a new way of being for the clients in relation to themselves, though I rarely need to do any talking for this to happen. In fact, the main focus while I work on people with my hands is to have my own awareness rest inside, noting, through my heart-felt sensing, my own state. I do not try to change my state. Rather, I relax and open as best I can even though it’s rarely perfect, all loving or fully relaxed.

Being present with what’s not perfect is a great softener to the ego that thinks it can find perfection. Just a little of this unconditional acceptance is enough to open my heart and its deeper clarity to perceive where the client is having difficulty finding their own kindness toward themselves. By navigating my own awareness through my heart, I then find I am easily guided where to go and what to do with my hands.

It is a daily moment-to-moment miracle to see how the person on the table opens without even seeing me. Then when I touch them with a mix of learned healing practices and intuitive guidance, spontaneous and profound healing occurs for both the practitioner and the client.

I believe that by using this approach we’re literally touching, with our awareness, the deepest, most reflexive part of the nervous system. The part that senses beyond the five senses into the world, feeling for what is safe and what is not. Before we speak our first words, the acculturation process begins, downloading societal norms into this part of the nervous system. It’s this part of the brain that rarely gets to feel unconditional love in our culture. However, when brought into Presence with unconditional awareness, something deep inside relaxes and is affirmed as a way of being that we have just forgotten. Once this “Loving Kindness” is anchored in the body through touch, it seems the nervous system at a reflex brain level begins to unwind distortions, tensions and pain, both physical and emotional.

The greatest commodity we have as a human is our ATTENTION. Whatever we put our attention on grows. It seems we need our attention to grow ourselves, and we need the attention of others to reflect our true beauty. It’s incredibly supportive to offer it as a gift to ourselves and from there, to another while both of us are held in an ever-bigger circle of inclusion, and thus intimacy. Unless we cultivate the experience of attention by itself through mindfulness practices, our attention then remains filtered through the powerful habits of our survival based separation thinking. Thus we experience a deep loneliness from this sense of separation from the world and ourselves. In other words, we suffer. Perhaps we are ready to try something different.

by Lawrence S. Conlan DC, ND

For more information on cultivating this approach towards yourself, or for Passionate Ease retreats, go to www.NetworkSpinalAwakening.com and look up retreats.

TIME IN TRAINING
Wellness practitioner Dr. Jeffrey Parham relates his experience being in both the client and helping roles

Spending time on the table as a client helped me see more of the defended self and observe with awareness the associated physical holding patterns I’ve used to keep defense in place without trying to change them or push them away. From that place of awareness I saw that I was able to choose to either participate or let those patterns rest in peace. I experienced the old distortion pattern frozen in time and space. It was my choice to replay the pattern over and over or observe the pattern without trying to change it. From this place of acceptance I can connect to love and gratitude and accept the healing, love and transformation available in the moment.

When the practitioner approached the table I felt intense desire to have my sacrum touched. When the practitioner instead placed her hand on my upper back behind my heart there was a feeling of Loving Kindness while at the same time a feeling of disappointment at not having my sacrum touched.

After sharing that feeling with the practitioner, she placed her hand on my sacrum and for a short time that felt just right. However it wasn’t long before my defended self felt threatened, responding by trying to take control, “You’re using too much pressure. Lighten up.”

At that time our teacher, Lawrence, told the practitioner to ignore what I’d just said. And in that moment I realized that was my defended self-speaking. I then allowed opening to occur, yet I started to sense something was lacking—like some sort of blockage. That’s when Lawrence pointed out to the practitioner that in her putting all of her compassion towards me there was none left for her. That to me on the table came across as a blockage, a holding back, in what I describe as lack. Once the practitioner shifted and began to feel compassion for both of us, there was the sense that the practitioner was “loving herself through me.” That safety helped me experience a deep unwinding, emotional release and connection of my sacrum to my heart, creating an opening into love, healing, and transformation. As the tears flowed, the feeling of immense gratitude and openness touched every part of my being.

When working as a practitioner, I focused on loving myself through the client by breathing the other into my heart, merging with the other while feeling love for both of us. I felt how I wanted to be touched and touched the client likewise. In that way a vortex of abundant safety, connection, love and healing was created.

Dr. Jeffrey Parham is a practitioner of Network Spinal Analysis at Wellness Rhythms a Denver chiropractic wellness center.

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Would you like the FREEDOM to do the things that bring you joy? That’s what people just like you find at this Denver, CO chiropractic office…

November 30, 2010

Chiropractor in Denver, CO gently relieves back pain, neck pain, headaches, stress and more! Improve energy and feel younger to do the things that bring you joy!

Chiropractic Denver

Antioxidant Linked To Longer Life

November 25, 2010
Home » News » Research News » Antioxidant Linked To Longer Life

Antioxidant Linked To Longer Life

By Rick Nauert PhD Senior News Editor
Reviewed by John M. Grohol, Psy.D. on November 23, 2010

Antioxidant Linked To Longer LifeNew medical research finds that high blood levels of the antioxidant alpha-carotene appear to be associated with a reduced risk of dying over a 14-year period.

Researchers have surmised that chronic diseases such as heart disease and cancer are a result of oxygen-related damage to cellular DNA, proteins and fats.

Although the damage seems to be part of the life process, researchers have learned that carotenoids, produced by many plants and microorganisms, act as antioxidants, counteracting the cellular damage.

Carotenoids in the human body are obtained mainly through eating fruits and vegetables rich in the nutrients, or through antioxidant supplements. Carotenoids include beta-carotene, alpha-carotene and lycopene.

However, although eating more fruits and vegetables has been linked to a lower risk of chronic diseases, randomized controlled trials have not shown any benefit for beta-carotene supplements.

“Therefore, carotenoids other than beta-carotene may contribute to the reduction in disease risk, and their effects on risk of disease merit investigation,” the authors wrote.

The report is posted online and in the Archives of Internal Medicine.

In the study, Chaoyang Li, M.D., Ph.D., of the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, and colleagues assessed the relationship between alpha-carotene and the risk of death among 15,318 adults age 20 and older.

Participants underwent a medical examination and provided blood samples between 1988 and 1994, and were followed through 2006 to determine whether and how they died.

Over the course of the study, 3,810 participants died; the risk for dying was lower with higher levels of alpha-carotene in the blood.

Compared with individuals with blood alpha-carotene levels between 0 and 1 micrograms per deciliter, the risk of death during the study period was 23 percent lower among who had concentrations between 2 and 3 micrograms per deciliter, 27 percent lower with levels between 4 and 5 micrograms per deciliter, 34 percent lower with levels between 6 and 8 micrograms per deciliter and 39 percent lower with levels of 9 micrograms per deciliter or higher.

Higher alpha-carotene concentration also appeared to be associated with lower risk of dying from cardiovascular disease or cancer individually, and of all other causes.

“The association between serum alpha-carotene concentrations and risk of death from all causes was significant in most subgroups stratified by demographic characteristics, lifestyle habits and health risk factors,” the authors wrote.

Alpha-carotene is chemically similar to beta-carotene but may be more effective at inhibiting the growth of cancer cells in the brain, liver and skin, they noted.

“Moreover, results from a population-based case-control study of the association between the consumption of fruits and vegetables and risk of lung cancer suggest that consumption of yellow-orange (carrots, sweet potatoes or pumpkin and winter squash) and dark-green (broccoli, green beans, green peas, spinach, turnip greens, collards and leaf lettuce) vegetables, which have a high alpha-carotene content, was more strongly associated with a decreased risk of lung cancer than was consumption of all other types of vegetables,” the authors wrote.

The results support increasing fruit and vegetable consumption as a way of preventing premature death, and suggest a need for clinical research into the health benefits of alpha-carotene, they concluded.

Source: JAMA and Archives Journals

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When we eat a variety of foods , think of eating a rainbow of colors, we healthier and happier. From Denver Chiropractic a wellness center, Wellness Rhythms.